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Home arrow Articles arrow History arrow A Short History of Abandoned and Downsized Canadian Military Bases
A Short History of Abandoned and Downsized Canadian Military Bases - Introduction Print E-mail
Written by Bruce Forsyth   
Article Index
Introduction
The Past
Pre to Post-Unification
Abandoned Bases Intro
Abandoned Bases: AB
Abandoned Bases: BC
Abandoned Bases: MB
Abandoned Bases: NB
Abandoned Bases: NL
Abandoned Bases: NT
Abandoned Bases: NS
Abandoned Bases: NU
Abandoned Bases: ON
Abandoned Bases: PE
Abandoned Bases: QC
Abandoned Bases: SK
Abandoned Bases: YT
Abandoned Bases: Outside Canada
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: AB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: BC
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: MB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: NB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: NS
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: ON
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: PE
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: QE
Downsized Bases Or Bases That Have Changed Their Function
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: BC
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NB
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NWT
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NS
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: ON
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: SK
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: QE
The Pinetree Line
The Pinetree Line: AB
The Pinetree Line: BC
The Pinetree Line: MB
The Pinetree Line: NB
The Pinetree Line: NL
The Pinetree Line: NWT
The Pinetree Line: NS
The Pinetree Line: ON
The Pinetree Line: QE
The Pinetree Line: SK
The Mid-Canada Line
Distant Early Warning Line
The North-West Territory
Distant Early Warning Line
The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan
Canadian Army Training Centres of World War II
The Northwest Staging Route
Abandoned Armouries
Abandoned Armouries: AB
Abandoned Armouries: ON
The Future
The Future: AB
The Future: NL
The Future: NWT
The Future: NS
The Future: ON
The Future: QE
The Future: SK
Current Canadian Military Bases

Abandoned Bases - NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

Royal Canadian Air Force Station Torbay:

Established by the RCAF on 15 December 1941 as the home of No. 11 Bomber Reconnaissance (BR) Squadron. No. 5 Coastal Artillery Co-operation Flight was established at the station in April 1942, disbanding in 1945. Other units occupying RCAF Station Torbay at various times during WW II were No. 125 Bomber Squadron, No. 145 (BR) Squadron, No. 128 (Fighter) Squadron and No. 5, No. 113 (BR) & No. 160 (BR) Squadrons The Royal Air Force and the United States Army Air Corps also maintained detachments at the station until December 1946.

RCAF Station Torbay closed on 1 April 1946 and although the airport became a civilian airport, United States Air Force personnel remained on site.

The post-war expansion of the RCAF resulted in many former aerodromes being re-opened and RCAF Station Torbay was re-activated on 15 April 1953. No. 107 Rescue Unit, formerly a detached unit of 103 RU located at RCAF Station Greenwood, was established at Torbay in 1954. No. 107 operated three converted Lancasters as search and rescue aircraft.

The United States Air Force continued to maintain a presence at the station, that being the 6600th Operations Squadron, until 1958 when they finally departed.

RCAF Station Torbay closed again in 1963, this time for good. The former station is now the St. John's Airport.

Only two buildings remain from the Air Force era and both are currently being used as storage. All other buildings were torn down long ago.

Source Material: "Sentinel " Magazine from January 1984, Aviation in Newfoundland & Labrador, Torbay web site - www.home.thezone.net/~ainal/torbay, the St. John's International Airport web site - http://www.stjohnsairport.com/sitemap/default.htm, information supplied by Walter Butt, Commercial Development Officer, St. John's International Airport Authority Inc (2004) & Wings For Victory by Spencer Dunmore.

 


Royal Canadian Air Force Detachment Botwood:

Opened in 1941 as an anti-submarine patrol station.

Source Material: "History of Canadian Airports" by T. M. McGrath.

 


Bull's Bay Naval Base:

Opened in 1943 south of St. John's as a naval repair depot. The base closed in September 1945. Only 2 wooden sheds remain.

Source material: "Military Installations of Canada Volume III: Atlantic" by Paul Ozorak.

 


No. 31 Personnel Depot:

Opened in the summer on 1941 as a stop-over station for airmen awaiting assignment to training schools and active service squadrons. The Depot closed on 31 January 1945.

The depot then became No. 10 Release Centre shortly after War's end. No. 10 RC closed in 1946. The former depot is now Victoria Industrial Park. A few buildings, including the drill hall, remain today.

Source material: "History of Aviation in the Greater Moncton Area" by Jim Kinne (1987) & "Abandoned Military Installations of Canada Volume III: Atlantic" by Paul Ozorak.



Last Updated ( Thursday, 21 November 2013 )
 
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