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Home arrow Articles arrow History arrow A Short History of Abandoned and Downsized Canadian Military Bases
A Short History of Abandoned and Downsized Canadian Military Bases - Introduction Print E-mail
Written by Bruce Forsyth   
Article Index
Introduction
The Past
Pre to Post-Unification
Abandoned Bases Intro
Abandoned Bases: AB
Abandoned Bases: BC
Abandoned Bases: MB
Abandoned Bases: NB
Abandoned Bases: NL
Abandoned Bases: NT
Abandoned Bases: NS
Abandoned Bases: NU
Abandoned Bases: ON
Abandoned Bases: PE
Abandoned Bases: QC
Abandoned Bases: SK
Abandoned Bases: YT
Abandoned Bases: Outside Canada
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: AB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: BC
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: MB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: NB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: NS
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: ON
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: PE
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: QE
Downsized Bases Or Bases That Have Changed Their Function
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: BC
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NB
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NWT
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NS
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: ON
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: SK
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: QE
The Pinetree Line
The Pinetree Line: AB
The Pinetree Line: BC
The Pinetree Line: MB
The Pinetree Line: NB
The Pinetree Line: NL
The Pinetree Line: NWT
The Pinetree Line: NS
The Pinetree Line: ON
The Pinetree Line: QE
The Pinetree Line: SK
The Mid-Canada Line
Distant Early Warning Line
The North-West Territory
Distant Early Warning Line
The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan
Canadian Army Training Centres of World War II
The Northwest Staging Route
Abandoned Armouries
Abandoned Armouries: AB
Abandoned Armouries: ON
The Future
The Future: AB
The Future: NL
The Future: NWT
The Future: NS
The Future: ON
The Future: QE
The Future: SK
Current Canadian Military Bases

 

QUEBEC


Canadian Forces Station Senneterre:

Opened as RCAF Station Senneterre on 1 June 1953, the home of No. 34 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron, one of Canada's Pinetree Line radar stations.

After the closure of CFS Val d'Or in 1976, CFS Senneterre took over Search and Rescue operations for Quebec's northwestern region.

In 1985, DND announced that the Pinetree Line would be shut down as a part of the North American Air Defence Modernization Plan. As a result, CFS Senneterre closed on 1 August 1988.

Most of the buildings remain today.

Source Material: DND Press Releases from June 1989.

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Canadian Forces Station Mont Apica:

Opened in 1952 as RCAF Station Mont Apica, with the radar functions being run by No. 201 Radio Station. No. 201 Radio Station was itself re-named No. 12 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron. Part of the Station's role was as a control centre for the fighter squadrons of Air Defence Command and a long-range radar station.

In 1963, The Intercept Controller School was established at the station, remaining until disbanding in 1969.

Technological changes made the station redundant and it closed in 1990.  No. 12 Radar Squadron was transferred to CFB Bagotville.

Nothing remains of CFS Mont Apacia today. 12 Radar Squadron relocated to 3 Wing Baggotvile where it continues to provide radar tracking for fighter aircrew training.

Additional Source Material: DND press release from May 1989 & July 1989.

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Canadian Forces Station Val d'or:

The Royal Canadian Air Force established RCAF Station Val d'Or in 1954 as a fighter-interceptor base intended to protect Montreal and the St. Lawrence River valley and Great Lakes basin against Soviet bomber aircraft. The airfield was topped with asphalt by the mid-1950s as RCAF Station Val d'Or became a key component in NORAD.

During the early 1960s, RCAF Station Val-d'Or was considered as the site for one of the Regional Emergency Government Headquarters, commonly known as a "Diefenbunker", but this was put at CFB Valcartier instead.

By 1964, the flying mission at RCAF Station Val-d'Or had changed to see all aircraft based at RCAF Station North Bay and RCAF Station Bagotville but were deployed to the base in rotations; in essence, RCAF Station Val-d'Or was now a forward operating base.

During the 1960s, RCAF Station Val-d'Or became home to numerous airborne nuclear weapons as RCAF CF-101 Voodoo interceptors were fitted with the AIR-2 Genie.

The rise of the FLQ terrorist group during this period saw the Canadian military devise strategies to safeguard nuclear ordnance primarily stored at RCAF Station Val-d'Or against being seized by the group's members.

The Unification of the Forces resulted in the station being renamed CFS Val-d'Or.

CFS Val-d'Or saw its mission gradually decrease during the 1970s and it was closed in 1976.

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Canadian Forces Station Chibougamau:

Opened in 1962 as RCAF Station Chibougamau, with the radar functions being run by No. 10 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron. The station was re-named CFS Chibougamau in 1968.

The station closed in 1988. Most of the former station remains, with parts being used by the City of Chibougamau. The operations building was used briefly by Transport Canada, but was demolished in 1993.

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Royal Canadian Air Force Station St Sylvester:

Opened in 1953 as RCAF Station Ste.-Marie, with the radar functions being run by No. 206 RCAF Radio Station. The radar unit was later re-named No. 13 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron. The station itself was later re-named RCAF Station St.-Sylvestre.

The station was declared redundant and closed in 1964. Other that the abandoned roadways, nothing remains of CFS St.-Sylvestre today.

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Canadian Forces Station Lac St Denis:

Opened in 1952 as RCAF Station Lac St Denis, with the radar functions being run by No. 201 RCAF Radio Unit, later re-designated No. 11 AC & W Squadron.  At the same time, 1 AC&W Squadron was re-designated 1 Air Defence Control Centre and remained as such until its disbandment, as the Montreal NORAD Sector, on 15 September 1962.

The station became SAGE capable on 15 September 1962 and began to report to the Bangor Sector at Topsham AFS, Maine. In September 1963, 11 AC&W began reporting to the Ottawa Sector at CFB North Bay. At one time a detachment of 1 Radar and Communications School RCAF Station Clinton Ontario were training enlisted personnel as Fighter Control Operators at the station. In September 1965, a new basic trade school to train Air Defence Technicians was formed to meet the forecast trade shortage. By 1973, over 25 courses had been run with almost 500 graduates.

11 AC&W was the operation responsible for the control of all test flights of the CF-104 Starfighters being built at Canadair in Montreal. The aircraft would leave the Cartierville Airport and proceed to the testing area under positive control of Lac St. Denis.

With the Unification of the Forces, the station was re-named CFS Lac St. Denis.  

In March 1972, CFS Lac St. Denis became a detachment of the North Bay based Air Weapons Control and Countermeasures School (AWC&CS). Eventually Lac St. Denis acquired the Air Weapons Control and Countermeasures School and they carried on training Air Defence Technicians for two more years. The school was later moved to CFB Falconbridge and then to its current location at North Bay, Ontario.

The Canadian NORAD Region's ROCCs, both Canada East and Canada West, commenced operations in August 1984, with Lac St. Denis attached to Canada East.

The station ceased operations in December 1985 and the station closed on 1 August 1986.

Various business have occupied the site without ever achieving any long-term success. The site is now abandoned, left open and easily accessible. All that remains is the operations centre, graffiti-covered and in desolate state after fires and water infiltration, is often visited by paintball enthusiasts.

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Canadian Forces Station Moisie:

Opened in 1953 as RCAF Station Moisie with the radar functions being run by No. 211 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.

The station was re-named CFS Moisiein 1968.

CFS Lac Moisie closed in 1986. The PMQs remain, as do some of the station’s buildings, but the main operations site was demolished in the 1980s.

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Royal Canadian Air Force Station Parent:

Opened in 1953, with radar functions being run by No. 207 RCAF Radio Station. This was one of the last Pinetree stations to be built. The radar unit was later re-designated 14 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.

The station was declared redundant and closed in 1964.

Only the PMQs remain today, some still inhabited, but little else other than the foundations of the demolished buildings.  All that remains of the operational site are the foundations and paved parking lot at the top of the mountain.



Last Updated ( Thursday, 21 November 2013 )
 
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