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Home arrow Articles arrow History arrow A Short History of Abandoned and Downsized Canadian Military Bases
A Short History of Abandoned and Downsized Canadian Military Bases - Introduction Print E-mail
Written by Bruce Forsyth   
Article Index
Introduction
The Past
Pre to Post-Unification
Abandoned Bases Intro
Abandoned Bases: AB
Abandoned Bases: BC
Abandoned Bases: MB
Abandoned Bases: NB
Abandoned Bases: NL
Abandoned Bases: NT
Abandoned Bases: NS
Abandoned Bases: NU
Abandoned Bases: ON
Abandoned Bases: PE
Abandoned Bases: QC
Abandoned Bases: SK
Abandoned Bases: YT
Abandoned Bases: Outside Canada
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: AB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: BC
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: MB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: NB
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: NS
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: ON
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: PE
Closed Bases That Still Have A Military Presence: QE
Downsized Bases Or Bases That Have Changed Their Function
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: BC
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NB
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NWT
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: NS
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: ON
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: SK
Bases That Have Downsized or Changed Their Function: QE
The Pinetree Line
The Pinetree Line: AB
The Pinetree Line: BC
The Pinetree Line: MB
The Pinetree Line: NB
The Pinetree Line: NL
The Pinetree Line: NWT
The Pinetree Line: NS
The Pinetree Line: ON
The Pinetree Line: QE
The Pinetree Line: SK
The Mid-Canada Line
Distant Early Warning Line
The North-West Territory
Distant Early Warning Line
The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan
Canadian Army Training Centres of World War II
The Northwest Staging Route
Abandoned Armouries
Abandoned Armouries: AB
Abandoned Armouries: ON
The Future
The Future: AB
The Future: NL
The Future: NWT
The Future: NS
The Future: ON
The Future: QE
The Future: SK
Current Canadian Military Bases

Abandoned Bases - QUEBEC

 

Canadian Forces Base Montreal - Lasalle Detachment:

Opened in 1951 as HMCS Hochelaga, a Naval Supply depot. The centre was downgraded to a Detachment of CFB Montreal in 1966 and re-designated as No. 4 Supply Depot.

No. 4 Supply Depot closed in 1970.

The site is now an industrial complex and a transit terminal. Nothing remains of the former supply depot today.

Sourse Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.

 


Royal Canadian Air Force Station Lachine:

Opened in September 1941 as a staging point for ferrying aircraft and supplies overseas for the war, as well as the home of No. 5 Manning Depot until 1943. The station remained open after World War II, becoming part of the post-war RCAF.

426 Transport Squadron re-formed at Lachine in March 1947, remaining until moving to Trenton 1 September 1959. 436 Transport Squadron re-formed at Dorval on 1 April 1949. Air Transport Command moved to RCAF Station Lachine from RCAF Station Rockcliffe in August 1951.

436 Transport Squadron moved to RCAF Station Downsview on 1 July 1956.

RCAF Station Lachine closed in 1959. Air Transport Command re-located to RCAF Station Trenton on 12 September 1959. The former station is now the Dorval Airport.

Source Material: 8 Wing Trenton News Releases - http://www.8wing.trenton.dnd.ca/archives/news110897.htm, "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak & History of the 400 Series Squadrons - http://www.airforce.dnd.ca/airforce/eng/history_400s/rcafsqns.htm.

 


No. 4 Elementary Flying Training School:

Opened near Windsor Mills on 24 June 1940 under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The school closed on 25 August 1944.

The airfield no longer exists today.

Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.

 


No. 11 Elementary Flying Training School:

Opened near Cap de la Madeline on 14 October 1940 under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The school closed on 11 February 1944.

Other than one h-hut, nothing remains of the aerodrome today. Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.

 


No. 22 Elementary Flying Training School / No. 8 Air Observer School:

Opened near Ancienne Lorette in 1941 under the British Commonwealth Air Training plan. The school closed in 1945.

The airport was then taken over by the Department of Transport and now operates as the Aeroport de Quebec.

Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.

 


Royal Canadian Air Force Detachment St-Honore:

Opened in June 1942 as Relief Landing Field for No. 1 Operational Training Unit at Baggotville under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

The Detachment closed on 5 January 1945.

Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.   


 
No. 9 Bombing & Gunnery School:

Opened near Mont-Joli in 1941, the station was one of the largest schools of the BCATP.  The aerodrome also served as an active anti-submarine station and home to No. 4 Repair Depot, No. 3 Comstruction and Maintenance Unit, NO. 1 Wireless Relay Detachment, along with a small contingent of the Lake Superior Regiment for coastal patrols.

No. 9 B&GS cesed operation in March 1945 and the aerodrome became home to No. 6 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Depot.  In December 1945, the depot closed and the aerodrome was transferred to the Department of Transportation.  It now operates as the Mont-Joli Airport.

Today, only one hangar, a vehilce shed and two of the three runways remain from the RCAF days.
 
Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.

   


Canadian Forces Station La Macaza:

Originally opened in 1962 as a relief landing field for the RCAF, the aerodrome later became home to 447 SAM Squadron, armed with 29 nuclear tipped CIM-10 Bomarc missiles.  The station had all the amenities of an RCAF station, which included PMQs, a mess hall, barracks, recreation centre, administration building and a chapel.

In 1968, the station became CFS La Macaza, but this was short-lived as the station closed September 1972 following the removal of the Bomarc missiles.

The former station was transferred to the Department of Indian and Northern Development and turned into a school for native students. 

In 1978, the former station was again transferred to the Correctional Service of Canada, becoming La Macaza Institution.  Although the PMQs were demolished, the rest of the station remains, including the missile trailers, which are used for storage purposes.

The airfield became a civilian airport, now known as the La Macaza – Mont Tremblant International Airport.

Source material:  "Abandoned Military Installations of Canada, Vol. II:  Quebec", by Paul Ozorak.

   


 
RCAF Detachment La Toque:

RCAF Detachment La Toque was an emergency airfield built in the early 1950s for the RCAF's Air Defence Command.  The 5000 foot runway and buildings were transferred to the Department of Transportation in 1960 and today is the La Toque Airport. 

The Detachment was also used by reserve radar units in the 1950s as a training ground.

Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.    


 

No. 34 Canadian Forces Ammunition Depot / Camp Bouchard
Opened in August 1941 at St Therese, near Montreal, by Defence Industries Limited, a subsidiary of Canadian Industries Limited, to make munitions on behalf of the Canadian Government.  Officially known as Allied War Supplies Corporation Project 21, the camp was one of DIL's premier shell-fitting centres. The complex consisted of 343 buildings over 6000 acres, including offices, shops dormitories, a hospital, assembly lines, a fire hall, a community centre and a power house, all supported by rail lines to transport raw and finished material.  Production ceased in 1945 with peace on the horizon.

In 1946, the centre was taken over by the Department of National Defence and turned over to the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps (RCOC), becoming No. 4 Ordnance Ammunition Depot.  A year later, the depot was re-designated No. 34 (Central) Ordnance Ammunition Depot, but it was also know as Camp Bouchard when it began being used by reserve army forces as a training camp.

During the 1950s, the ammunition assembly lines were removed, but the camp remained a busy training centre.  Permanent Married Quarters (PMQs) were constructed and the camp became home to the RCOC School's ammunition wing.

As a result of the unification of the forces in the mid-1960s, the camp was re-designated No. 34 Canadian Forces Ammunition Depot, however, more change was in the wind.

The unification also lead to a reduction and consolidation of bases in Canada.  As a result, operations at Bouchard were terminated in 1969, and the depot itself closed in 1972.

All the military and ammunition production buildings were demolished and today, only the PMQs and a some bunkers remain.  A motor vehicle test centre for Transport Canada now occupies the eastern section of the former camp.

After World War II, the depot was also used as a training area for local Militia units. Most of the property was sold off between 1972-1988.

Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.

 


No. 1 Wireless School.

Originally opened at RCAF Station Trenton prior to WWII, the school relocated in 1940 to Montreal, taking up residence at the former Nazareth Institute hospital for the blind (built by the Grey Nuns). This complex of 13 buildings were transformed into a training school for wireless operators and air gunners. Flying training for the school was conducted at No. 13 SFTS at St. Hubert.

In August 1944, the school relocated to RCAF Station Mount Hope.

After the war, the building was sold to the provincial government and became the Queen Mary Veterans Hospital in 1946, then Hospital Cote-des-Neiges in 1978. Since 1997, it has been the Institut Universitaire de Geriatrie de Montreal.

Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak & the McGill Digital Library - http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/hospitals/search/hospinfo.php

 


Naval Radio Station Fort Chimo:

Opened in 1949 as Naval Radio Station Fort Chimo as a High Frequency Direction Finding station.

NRS Fort Chimo had a brief existence as it closed in 1953. The station was replaced by NRS Frobisher Bay.

Source Material: Canada's National Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) organization web site - www.tscm.com.cse.html.

 


His Majesty's Canadian Ship D'Iberville:

Opened as a recruit training establishment in Quebec City in 1952 as His Majesty's Canadian Ship D'Iberville. However HMCS D'Iberville had a brief existence, as it closed in 1961. The recruit school moved to LaSalle, Que.

Source Material: "Badges of the Canadian Navy" by LT (N) Graeme Arbuckle & "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak.

 




His Majesty's Canadian Ship St. Hyacinthe:

Opened on 1 October 1941, the facility served as the Royal Canadian Navy's Communications School.  Situated 35 miles east of Montreal, school trained about 2,600 and during its almost five years of service.

The station closed on 20 February 1946.


Source Material: "Abandoned Military Installations in Canada Vol II: Quebec" by Paul Ozorak. 

 



Last Updated ( Thursday, 21 November 2013 )
 
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